Wudang Blog / Wudang Kung Fu

The Nature of Wudang Kungfu

Wudang Kungfu offers a complete package of traditional martial arts, malleable from different perspectives and individual perceptions. The Way of the Tao is a contradiction in terms, since according to Lao Tzu the Tao is always everywhere and every time. The path of self-development is the way of the Tao. Where, When and How exactly do you start, is less important because the way is always there and will always find to the self – the Tao.

But what exactly now is important in Wudang Kungfu?

Is best explained in 3 points:

1.Your own personal identification with the self and integration of mind and body. By emotional self-reflection one gets the balance and control. The preoccupation with oneself is important for a better understanding.

2.Mental and physical freedom. Only those who are free, also have the most selection and thereby a better natural order. In the life of a child we learn for the first time one of the greatest physical and mental freedoms. Strength, speed, agility, and extensibility are important features that make up our physical vitality and are essential for our advancement. The child itself does not have own prejudices and opinions, so it has no mental limitations. What makes Taoists, is the acquired wisdom and understanding that you can learn something from children.

3.The personalization and identification of the Immortals, different animals, dragons, Phoenix, Zen Wu of the immortal warrior or the five elements. These are important role models and philosophical guidelines on the implementation and understanding of Wudang Kungfu. The Taoists maintain ancestral traditions and legends, many of these things do not make it over the language barrier to the West. But are an essential component of Wudang Kungfu (Neigong, Qigong, Liangyi,Taichi).

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Wudang Kungfu and the Taoist Healing Arts

By the Taoist origin of Wudang Kungfu the focus is particularly high on life support exercises.

According to the principles of the bagua (TCM – Traditional Chinese Medicine) Wudang Taoists tried to keep away from extreme opposites by compensation. They learned to understand to live a balanced and healthy life. Immortality was not reached by this, but the mental and physical balance was also the meaning of life, the way of the Tao clearer to understand. Since everyone is unique and has its own connection to the Tao, one’s self is important as a model. There is no universal formula or policy, to adapt the Taoists. While there are forms that have the same sequences, but the implementation, intuition and adaptation is individual.

Thus, the application of the Taoist healing arts is only effective if the intuition and identification fits with the Self. Everything before is therapeutic exercise and has nothing to do with the intrinsic values of Wudang Kungfu. Self-knowledge is the way to Wudang Kungfu and the way to your own development. It may be seen from the surface as a bit selfish, but real changes always take place in yourself. Development is always based on yourself and at best inspire the others.

Till there can be spoken about healing, we must understand and analyze ourselves. Each Taoist is his own doctor, we observe our emotional, mental and physical state. This knowledge cannot be learned quickly but requires its own experience and self-reflection. There is no quick way or a universal formula to memorize, also it is advised to avoid persons who assert exactly that. The right approach and exercises to real Taoist healing practice you learn with Michael Weichhardt, from this knowledge you can then find your own way. The healing aspect of Wudang Kungfu is not very beginner-friendly and requires some basic knowledge, both mentally and physically.

Wudang Kungfu acts as preventive cure against the following:

  • Stress, anxiety, aggression, agitation, depression, negative self-awareness and -befinden.
  • Joint and muscle pain, muscle cramps, weak bones, spinal complaints, back and shoulder tension.
  • Cardiac arrhythmia, renal malfunction, fatigue, memory and concentration problems, weakness, dizziness, circulatory problems and poor blood pressure.

If you already have serious health problems, please seek medical attention from a proper doctor. Wudang Kungfu is like TCM, best as a preventative cure.

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Fighting aspect of Wudang Kungfu

Wudang Kungfu as a martial art includes in a real fight many aspects, because mental and physical condition play a major role. In addition to the proper technique the chance to defend yourself is higher if you are trained and better balanced at all levels than the attacker. When someone attacks, it forces a reaction of defense, through the training of Taichi and Liangyi the forces of Yin and Yang can be deliberately manipulated and used against the attacker.

The interaction between the various disciplines

By Neigong one attains spiritual peace and the necessary speed in the reaction. Only those who are not rushed and remains quiet, also have the most of reaction time. With Qigong you gain a stable posture, good breathing, body tension and strength. Only through the interplay of all Wudang disciplines the agility, speed, flexibility, relaxation and strength is properly trained and are in any fighting technique the necessary advantage. The Kungfu forms are emotional and situational scenarios, which are suitable for daily training and preparation. The internalization of these forms is important for smooth and intuitive execution of the contained fighting techniques. The learning of a variety of applications and methods is possible, including many hand forms but also the handling of weapons (sword, staff, saber, giant saber, fan …) Michael Weichhardt guides the entire martial arts aspect of Wudang Kungfu, on mental, emotional and physical level.

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Wudang Internal Martial Arts


Wudang Internal Martial Arts Kungfu

Wudang internal martial arts most notably Taichi Quan, Xingyi Quan, Baji Quan and Baguazhang – utilizes Qigong training as its foundation so that efficient whole-body movement may be employed in a martial arts context.  Within these arts the self-cultivation and refinement of the practitioner is emphasized rather than the sport competition that is often found in other types of martial practice within this country.  Internal boxing is a traditional martial art and thereby stresses the development of proper respect for one’s lineage, teacher, community and self.  As such, it is a powerful tool to empower the practitioner by enhancing feelings of self worth and heightening one’s self awareness. The internal martial arts, furthermore, yield many positive psychological and physical health benefits because they are essentially an extension of Qigong training. Finally, internal martial arts places the practitioner within a healthy and supportive community that is able to uphold the individual for life and is very literally considered to be one’s extended family

Wudang Qigong Internal Martial Arts

Qigong the Foundation of Internal Martial Arts

In Chinese philosophy and medicine there exists the concept of "chi" (Qi), a vital force that animates the body. One of the avowed aims of Qigong is to foster the circulation of this "chi" within the body, the belief being that by doing so the health and vitality of the person are enhanced. This "chi" circulates in patterns that are close related to the nervous and vascular system and thus the notion is closely connected with that of the practice of acupuncture and other oriental healing arts.

Another aim of Qigong is to foster a calm and tranquil mind, focused on the precise execution of these exercises. Learning to do them correctly provides a practical avenue for learning about such things as balance, alignment, fine scale motor control, rhythm of movement, the genesis of movement from the body's vital centre, and so on. Many practitioners notice benefits in terms of correcting poor postural, alignment or movement patterns which can contribute to tension or injury. Furthermore the meditative nature of the exercises is calming and relaxing in and of itself.

Wudang Internal Martial Arts Split

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Wudang Tai Chi and Tai Yi

Wudang Master Chen ShiyuTai Chi is an internal training method that was created by the great Daoist priest and immortal, Zhang San Feng at Wudang Mountain. Generally when people discuss “Tai Chi” they are referring to Tai Chi Quan, or the forms practice involved in Tai Chi. However, in Wudang, Tai Chi Quan is considered a part of the greater 'Tai Chi System'. The Tai Chi System is composed of 3 parts: Wuji, Tai Chi, and Tai Yi. Each of these three parts contains their own practices, purposes, and methods of training. Although the Tai Chi System is separated into three parts, they are all integrated and complementary to the others.

Wuji is another name for ‘nei dan’ (Taoist meditation practice). The practice of Wuji (loosely translated as 'ultimate emptiness') is for the cultivation of our three vitalities: Jing (Essence), Qi (Energy), and Shen (spirit). We practice Wuji in order to promote the health of these three vitalities; Wuji is also understood as the road to immortality. In order to become stronger and more robust in our health and our lives, we must strengthen and practice our Jing, Qi, and Shen. For more information about Wuji, please visit the Meditation section of the website.

Tai Chi is the balancing interaction of yin and yang. Under the Tai Chi System, Tai Chi Quan is the form that we use to cultivate ourselves and learn to develop and understand feeling in our bodies and how to integrate that into movement. In Taijiquan practice we learn to conceal hardness within the softness of movement and learn to use our breathing through the dantian, and our intention and internal awareness to guide our movement. Contrary to the widespread misconception that Taijiquan is simply a callisthenic exercise for the elderly, it is actually a deep internal practice that requires great dedication and a strong determination.

Tai Yi is the separation of yin and yang. Under the Tai Chi System, Tai Yi Quan is for the use of the energy that we have cultivated through our practice. Whereas in Taijiquan we combine the soft and hard, in Liangyiquan practice, we separate the soft and hard. The power of Tai Yi Quan is explosive, resembling a bomb detonating; its practice is more for use in practical fighting application. While in Tai Chi Quan, all movement is the same speed, with the same balance in softness and hardness at once, Tai Yi Quan movement is slow and soft, followed by fast explosive movement, called fali.

The practice of Tai Yi Quan includes hand, eye, body, steps and explosive internal power. Its characteristics are combination of slow and fast, soft and hard, lightening reflects, and thundering movements. In combat application, it equips one with ways of starting late but reaching first. It is a must for Tai Chi practitioners. In Taoism, it is said that “Tai Chi is formed when combining Yin and Yang; the Two Extremes are formed when separating Yin and Yang.” Infinity is for training in mind, Tai Chi in the flow of internal energy through control of mind, and Tai Yi Quan in using the mind and internal energy for external power. As Tai Yi Quan combines fast and slow, soft and hard, and Yin and Yang, it is called the Two Extremes.


The practice of all of the elements that comprise the Tai Chi System can help us to more deeply understand our bodies and minds and learn the methods to make them cleaner, clearer, quieter, and healthier. Tai Chi training teaches us not only to train our muscles, tendons, and bones, but also to train our intention, internal feeling, awareness, and power.

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Wudang Xingyi Quan

Introduction to Xingyi Quan

Wudang Xingyi QuanXingyi Quan is one of the three most famous styles of internal wushu.It is believed to have been developed by Song Dynasty wushu hero and general, Yue Fei and gained wide spread popularity during the Qing Dynasty. Xingyi Quan uses Five Element Theory in its application and relies on the Six Harmonies in its practice and cultivation.The Six Harmonies can be broken down into the Three External Harmonies and the Three Internal Harmonies.

Three External Harmonies:

   1.The arms and legs in synchronicity and harmony.
   2.The elbows and knees in synchronicity and harmony.
   3.The shoulders and hips in synchronicity and harmony.

Three Internal Harmonies:

   1.The heart/mind acts in harmony with the will/intention.
   2.The will/intention acts in harmony with the internal energy.
   3.The internal energy acts in harmony with the power.

In Xingyi Quan great emphasis is placed on the intention leading the power through the body – the body then must work as one cohesive unit to allow for full expression of the explosive power.The intention, internal power, and external movement must coordinate and be synchronized – requiring total focus.

Health Benefits of Xingyi Quan

As in all systems of wushu practice, the fundamentals are most important.And in Xingyi Quan having correct posture is paramount. In Xingyi Quan one starts by first learning the correct posture which is maintained throughout all different aspects of the practice; as can be gleaned from the Three External Harmonies.When practicing Xingyi Quan one must keep the neck and back straight while at the same time being sure not to tense the muscles and tendons; the hips must be relaxed and dropped while the tailbone is tucked in so that the entire spine is straight – from the base of the skull, to the tip of the tailbone.This practice allows for a natural realigning of the spine as the muscles and tendons in the back begin to relax.For this reason it also promotes a release of tension that may be built up in the neck, shoulders, hips, and waist.

The practice of Xingyi Quan is also helpful in building up the strength of the leg muscles, particularly the thigh muscles.It is also helpful in strengthening the tendons and ligaments of the knees and ankles. As Xingyi Quan focuses on the synchronization of the intention and body, and requires focus, one can certainly improve their focus as well as mental organization.In the standing posture and moving practices deep dantian breathing is important to maintain which is helpful in lowering stress and bringing clarity of mind.

The Practice

When beginning to learn Xingyi Quan one must first learn the correct posture and alignment – focusing first on the Three External Harmonies and then gradually moving into the Three Internal Harmonies.When first beginning, the correct posture is first taught.After the posture is correct and familiar and firm foundation in the leg-work is then learned. One must build up the muscle and tendon strength in the legs and be able to perform large, low stepping that is also quick. Once a practitioner is familiar with these fundamentals, they can then go on to learn the next step which is the five basic fists that comprise the XIngyi System.As Xingyi Quan uses Five Element Theory in its application and practice Eech of the different fists corresponds to one of the five elements (water, wood, fire, metal, and earth).Each of these different fists has its individual practice.Once one is familiar with the five different fists, they can thenmove on to learning the Five Elements Linking Form and later to the 12 Animals of Xingyi Quan.

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Wudang Master Chen Shiyu 15th Generation

Chen Shiyu Wudang MasterMaster Chen Shiyu is the Headmaster of the Wudang Traditional Martial Arts School and it's main instructor. He was born in Central China's Hubei Province and now is the 15th disciple of Wudang Taoist Kungfu. Master Chen Shiyu showed great interest in Wudang Kung Fu. In 1993, he left his hometown and came to Mt Wudang. He learned martial arts from different teachers for some time and then he was honored to have Grand Master Zhong Yunlong as his teacher. The Daoist Master Zhong is the 14th successor of Wudang Wushu of Sanfeng branch. He saw that Shiyu was very hardworking and had a honest and simple mind, so he chose him as one of the closest disciples in 1996. Since then, with the strenuous cultivation from Master Zhong, Chen Shiyu has attained Internal Wudang Kung Fu which was in the past not easily spread out. All his Gongfu styles include Wudang Tai Chi, Eight Immortal, Taiyi, Bagua, Xuangong, and Xingyi and many methods of Taoist health-preserving.

Master Chen Shiyu Wudang Sword

  • Master Chen Shiyu became martial arts instructor in 1998 and that year he was also entered the famous Wudang Taoist Kungfu Troupe.
  • Master Chen Shiyu won the championship in the Wudangshan Wushu competition in March, 2000. In the same year he went to Wuhan and participated in the Yellow Crane Tower Wushu Performance. He has participated in performances in some foreign countries and Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan. Together with his teacher Zhong Yunlong, he has offered Wudang kungfu show for many principle leaders from China's central government. In 1999, the late Chinese general secretary Jiang Zemin paid a visit to Mt. Wudang. After watching Wudang Wushu show, he gladly wrote: "Wudang Quan is wonderful and everyone can practise it!"
  • I In May,2005, Master Chen Shiyu took the troupe to Xinghai Concert in South China's Guangzhou city for Wushu show in the 5th session of Taoist concert. Shortly after, he again took the troupe, together with the mainland Taoism Association, to Taiwan for an Across-Taiwan-Strait Taoism concert.
  • In September 2006, Master Chen Shiyu attained the championship of the nationwide Wudangshan-Wushu-Tournament in Wudang Tai Chi (Taijiquan).
  • In January 2007, he was invited to Pengyingxianguan in Hong Kong for lecturing of Daoist knowledge and demonstration of Sanfeng Taijiquan.
  • In September 2008, he participated in the Wudang area tryouts for the 3rd World Traditional Martial Arts Championships, and attained the first race in both Taijiquan and staff forms.
  • In August 2010, he was invited for the documentary of Wudang Martial arts introduction that shot by Chinese Nationwide Central Television.
  • In December 2010, he was given a Chinese national honor allowance for Martial Arts heritage reason.
  • In June 2012, he was invited to Norway, to teach Taichi.
  • In October 2012, he won the champion in the Fourth World Taichi & Health Competition.
  • In November 2012, he won a Traditional Boxing Champion and an very important Sword Champion in the Fifth World Traditional Martial Arts Championship Competition.

Master Chen Shiyu vows to bring Wudang Kung Fu to high development, let more people understand it and wishes every lover of Wudang Kung Fu to be healthy in body and heart; succeed the Tradition and bring it to the world.

If you would like to explore Wudang Taoist Kung Fu, you are invited to come to Huilong Temple to study with Master Chen Shiyu! http://www.wudangmartialarts.com/

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Wudang Baguazhang

Introduction to Baguazhang

Wudang BaguazhangThe Chinese word Baguazhang, when broken down by character, literally translates to 'Eight Trigram Palm'. The style derives its name and history from the Chinese book of divination, the Yi Jing, or 'The Book of Changes'. Baguazhang derives much of its practice from Taoist ritualistic circle walking and theory. Its practice and application is based on the principles and theories of the Yi Jing, Yin Yang Theory, and Five Element Theory. Baguazhang is one of the internal styles taught at the academy and can be characterized by its main foundation building training known as Bagua circle walking, major use of the palm and fingers for striking, and indirect circular attacks.

Health Benefits of Practicing Baguazhang

The basic practices of walking the Bagua circle and standing in the different still postures of Bagua can be greatly beneficial to one’s overall health.Walking the Bagua circle can help with strengthening the legs as well as promoting better joint mobility, flexibility and circulation in the lower body and establishing a greater sense of balance in the lower body. Because Bagua walking relies on constant movement for correct practice, this also engages the lungs for deeper respiration which can be greatly beneficial for strengthening the lungs as well as aerobic exercise for those looking to lose weight.Wudang Baguazhang
As with all internal Kung Fu practices, correct posture is important in Bagua practice.The Bagua circle walking posture is one that can greatly improve upper body flexibility and fluidity, loosen tense muscles and tendons, strengthen lower back and abdominal muscles and help to loosen up tension that is built up in the waist, back and shoulders. As one becomes more used to the straightened posture, muscles and tendons around the spine are allowed to relax while the spine itself becomes the major support for the full body posture.Improved spine posture helps to promote softer and more elastic tendons and muscles in the neck, shoulders, back, waist, and hips.By strengthening the waist, the health of the kidneys is also greatly improved.
Bagua circle walking also promotes improvement in all circulatory systems of the body and can bring about a greater bodily awareness and improved focus.Through continued development in all of the Baguazhang practices, a practitioner will be able to develop internal feeling and experience a greatly fluidity in movement.

The Practice

BaguazhangAs circle walking is the major foundation building component of Baguazhang training, students who train in Baguazhang must practice Bagua walking continuously. Once a student becomes comfortable with circle walking, they can then move on to learn the different palm changes that comprise the Bagua form. Baguazhang contains a variety of different techniques in application, utilizing the palm, fingers, elbows, quick, evasive footwork, kicks, joint locking, take downs, etc.An accomplished practitioner of Baguazhang can adapt their body to many different movements in striking postures and methods of attack as their body and intention has been trained to be stronger, adaptable, quick, sensitive, and fluid with improved coordination; developing a fluidity of motion that allows for adaptability much like water in a creak swimming around rocks. Fighting application of Baguazhang has been described as flying like a dragon, guarding like an ape, crouching like a tiger, and circling like an eagle. There also is a giant Saber called Bagua Dao which is used for exercising the Baguazhang movements.
 
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Austria Wudang Kung Fu School

The Wudang Master from Austria

 
Official Website

Michael Weichhardt
Taoist Name: Wei Mao Zi Ji (=helping others)
16th generation of Wudang Sanfengpai
Knowledge of languages: German, English, Chinese

After years of Taoist training in Wudang Michael Weichhardt was registered and documented as inheritor in Sanfeng family tree. He was certificated by Master Yuan Xiu Gang of (15th generation) and Master Zhong Yun Long (14th Gen.). He received a Taoist name, a certificate and a sword, which is to accompany him on his way.

Shortly after Michael Weichhardt lived 6 months on the Wudang Mountains with Master Chen Shiyu (Gen. 15th) in the temple of the returning dragon and focused there his internal Wudang Kungfu under personal training by Master Chen Shiyu. In May 2015 Michael Weichhardt returned to Vienna to spread Wudang Kungfu in his homeland.


Since an age of 13 years I train Kungfu and have traveled through Asia (Korea, Vietnam, China).

 

In Wudang I have realized my goal and the responsibility that is entailed with Kungfu. Taoism is not a religion for me. Tao is simply the way each of us embarks in life. Tao means for me to understand what you are doing in the Here and Now. Tao is neither good nor bad, so conscious behavior is important for us and the nature.


Life in the Wudang Mountains is not easy. The way of nature is easy, the implementation is difficult. The little things make importance for the great. To want to change something is the best prerequisite for an entry into Wudang Kungfu. “


 

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The Profound System of Wudang Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an internal training method that was created by the great Taoist priest and immortal, Zhang San Feng at Wudang Mountain. Generally when people discuss “Tai Chi” they are referring to Tai Chi Quan, or the forms practice involved in Tai Chi. However, in Wudang, Tai Chi Quan is considered a part of the greater 'Tai Chi System'. The Tai Chi System is composed of 3 parts: Wuji, Tai Chi, and Liang Yi. Each of these three parts contains their own practices, purposes, and methods of training. Although the Tai Chi System is separated into three parts, they are all integrated and complementary to the others.

Wuji is another name for ‘Nei Dan’ (Taoist meditation practice). The practice of Wuji (loosely translated as 'ultimate emptiness') is for the cultivation of our three vitalities: Jing (Essence), Qi (Energy), and Shen (spirit). We practice Wuji in order to promote the health of these three vitalities; Wuji is also understood as the road to immortality. In order to become stronger and more robust in our health and our lives, we must strengthen and practice our Jing, Qi, and Shen. For more information about Wuji, please visit the Meditation section of the website.

Tai Chi is the balancing interaction of yin and yang. Under the Tai Chi System, Tai Chi Quan is the form that we use to cultivate ourselves and learn to develop and understand feeling in our bodies and how to integrate that into movement. In Tai Chi Quan practice we learn to conceal hardness within the softness of movement and learn to use our breathing through the Dantian, and our intention and internal awareness to guide our movement. Contrary to the widespread misconception that Tai Chi Quan is simply a calisthenic exercise for the elderly, it is actually a deep internal practice that requires great dedication and a strong determination.


Liang Yi is the separation of yin and yang. Under the Tai Chi System, Liang Yi Quan is for the use of the energy that we have cultivated through our practice. Whereas in Tai Chi Quan we combine the soft and hard, in Liang Yi Quan practice, we separate the soft and hard. The power of Liang Yi Quan is explosive, resembling a bomb detonating; its practice is more for use in practical fighting application. While in Tai Chi  Quan, all movement is the same speed, with the same balance in softness and hardness at once, Liang Yi Quan movement is slow and soft, followed by fast explosive movement, called "Fa Li".

The practice of all of the elements that comprise the Tai Chi System can help us to more deeply understand our bodies and minds and learn the methods to make them cleaner, clearer, quieter, and healthier. Tai Chi training teaches us not only to train our muscles, tendons, and bones, but also to train our intention, internal feeling, awareness, and power.

Health Benefits of Practicing Tai Chi Quan

The practice of Tai Chi Quan holds great benefits for those looking to improve their physical, mental, and emotional health. Many people in modern society suffer from chronic neck, shoulder, back, hip and knee discomfort as a result of poor posture and bad living habits. If these strains are not rectified early, over time they can become chronic problems that have a great effect on one’s personal life and overall health; painful problems that become increasingly more difficult to fix as we become older and our bodies become stiffer. Tai Chi Quan places great importance on the cultivation of correct posture. By aligning the posture, maintaining a straight spine and relaxed back and waist, over time practitioners of Tai Chi Quan begin to feel a greater release of built up tension and stiffness in the neck, shoulders, back, waist, and hips. This happens as a result of the process of relaxing the muscles and tendons of the body, especially those that are in the neck, shoulders, and back.

The importance of correct bodily alignment and its effect on bodily health also extends to the rest of the body including the arms, hips, knees, and ankles. Being load bearing joints that receive much of the wear and tear of our daily living, the hips, knees, and ankles are often places where tension builds up and stiffness occurs. Incorrect bodily alignment can also have a strong effect on the lower body’s joints – especially the hips and knees. By loosening the muscles in the lower back, tension that is built up around the hips begins to lessen. The practice of the Tai Chi form greatly improves the strength of the knees and ankles as it gives the body an exercise which focuses greatly on the slow improvement of tendon and ligament health. As the practice of Tai Chi Quan is also helpful in promoting all of the different circulatory systems in the body, greater lubrication of the joints is also a natural result. Promoting greater joint mobility, ease of movement, and flexibility of tendons and muscles can also help to alleviate and prevent the aches and pains the body begins to suffer over time.

By releasing built up tension and stiffness in the different areas of the body, all of the circulatory systems begin to flow smoother as blockages are removed and tenseness is alleviated. The results of greater circulation being better immunity, improved blood flow, healthier and more balanced internal organs, a greater ability to eliminate toxins from the body, softer joints, etc.

The practice of Tai Chi Quan requires both focus and memory. Correct movement and a relaxed posture require determination and focus which can be built up over time as one’s practice progresses. As some Tai Chi  forms are upwards of 20 minutes long, improving one’s strength of memory is also important. Most students begin with learning a shorter Tai Chi  form before moving on to longer forms, but soon realize that the once daunting task of learning and remembering the longer forms is actually quite easy.

Tai Chi practice necessitates and promotes a relaxed and focused mind and emotional state. Those students who suffer from stress and/or emotional imbalance will find that in practicing Tai Chi over time their emotions become more balanced and their overall temperament becomes more peaceful as a result of the practice. This comes about through stronger and more balanced organs (which have great influence over the health and balance of the emotions), strengthened circulation, and focusing on regulating deep Dantian breathing and fluidity in slow movement – all changes that come about naturally through practice.

The human mind is like a lake. When one looks into the calm waters of a lake they can see to great depths. What is reflected on the surface is clear. When the waters are not calm, seeing through to the bottom is impossible and one’s reflection becomes difficult to discern. With a quieter mind like still waters one can reflect more clearly and understand life more deeply; entering deeper into the mysteries of internal practice and cultivating bountiful jing, qi, and shen in the body. Through the practice of the Tai Chi  System one can truly enjoy radiant health in all of its manifestations.

Wudang Store offers the best Tai Chi Products directly imported from the Wudang Mountains. Feel free to see our Tai Chi Clothing, Tai Chi Swords, Tai Chi Sabers, Tai Chi Shoes and much more.

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